Back to the bush

Melbourne captain Andrew Kent will lead his side into battle against Dandenong at Peter Siddle Oval on Saturday.
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CRICKET

PREMIER CRICKET

By SAMUEL DARROCH

AUSTRALIAN internationals Brad Hodge and James Pattinson are poised to bring their explosive talents to Morwell this weekend when Melbourne and Dandenong collide at the Peter Siddle Oval.

Latrobe Cricket Club will host the Victorian Premier Cricket round five one-day clash, as the state’s leading competition heads to nine regional centres for its annual country round.

Former test player and prolific twenty20 slugger Hodge slapped a quickfire 41 for Melbourne last week, while fast bowler Pattinson has been playing as a specialist batsman for Dandenong this year due to injury.

Both men are possible inclusions for the country round, with the teams yet to be selected at the time of going to print.

Also in the mix is Melbourne captain and premier cricket legend Andrew Kent, with more than 9000 runs to his name, and his counterpart in former Queensland shield player Dan Doran.

Dandenong openers Tim Donnell and Brett Forsyth are class acts – the latter comes into the clash on the back of a sterling 115* against Geelong last weekend – while promising all-rounder William Ryan will likely feature for Melbourne.

There was an outside chance of the oval’s namesake and former Latrobe player Peter Siddle making an appearance for Dandenong, however international commitments prevented him from taking part.

Premier cricket co-ordinator Peter Binns said the country round was all about bringing the game back to the bush.

“You go back a few years and there used to be the odd game in the country… those days are gone,” he said.

“It’s our way of trying to give a little bit back to country Victoria because it’s been a fantastic source of players over a long period of time.

Players from the bush, and the country areas love showing off their facilities and hospitality is always fantastic.

“The players really enjoy getting out there.”

Latrobe president Nic Brewer said the match was a chance for local talent to be inspired, and hoped to draw a crowd to rival last year’s cracking Central Gippsland grand final.

“Latrobe is extremely proud to be hosting this match. We don’t get a lot of top level cricket played in the region, and hopefully it’s a chance for some of the younger guys playing in the area to get a first-hand look at what it takes to play at the next level,” Brewer said.

“Kids like Blake Mills from Morwell and Matt Hibbs from Newborough are trying their luck down in the city now, following the path forged by Peter Siddle on his way from country cricket to the Victorian and Australian teams, and hopefully this gives the next generation of young cricketers the inspiration to follow that lead.”

Last year Ted Summerton Reserve, Moe and Morwell Recreation Reserve hosted a weekend of premier cricket twenty20 action in the corresponding round.

Central Gippsland Cricket’s round of matches will be played on Sunday to accommodate the VPC clash.

Saturday’s match begins at 11am at Maryvale Reserve, Morwell.

Admission is free.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.


Men of the north do battle

CRICKET
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CGCA

THIS weekend’s round of Central Gippsland Cricket will be played on Sunday to accommodate the Victorian Premier Cricket match at Peter Siddle Oval, Morwell on Saturday.

Mirboo North v Yallourn North

THE major clash of this round’s Energy Australia Cup matches sees the Tigers take on the Bombers, two vastly different teams at this point in the season.

Mirboo North is the reigning premier, but after a loss last round to rival Latrobe needs a win to bounce back to the top.

Captain Rob Phoenix has been bowling well but his low scores with the bat will be of concern.

Meanwhile Yallourn North is a team on the rise under new skipper Patrick Spiteri, with wins against Morwell, Trafalgar and Moe lifting them to the top of the ladder.

With both teams hungry for points, this game has the potential to be the big thriller of the weekend.

Moe v Trafalgar

THE young Lions take on the resurgent Ships, with Andrew Philip’s charges hopeful of exploiting Trafalgar’s perceived weakness on turf wickets.

Aaron Walshe had been important with the ball so far for Moe while the spin attack has been key.

For the Ships, captain Rhys Holdsworth is the main threat but a supporting cast of Chris Robinson, Aiden George and James Blaser is hard to overlook.

Morwell v Newborough Bulldogs

NEWBOROUGH continues its return to the top level against a stuttering Morwell which looked the goods with flashy new signings in pre-season but have so far failed to perform.

David Embleton has been dangerous without building sustained pressure, while Gavin Bailey and Davin Charleston have so far flattered to deceive.

For the Bulldogs the only way is up as they continue to demonstrate grit and tenacity, stubbornly refusing to give away their wickets cheaply.

Royce Colgrave had a fantastic all-round game last week and the young left-armer will be hoping to continue his development.

Thorpdale v Latrobe

THE Blues are bursting with confidence after a maiden Energy Australia Cup victory last round, but face a much sterner test this week against the Sharks.

New boy Fraser Smith is in form after a ton and GCL runs, but is in for an examination from Latrobe’s bowling attack of Mitch Cowell, Brendan Evans and new signing Chris Johnson.

Latrobe has yet to work out its best XI and with Kaushik Aphale still to arrive in the country, plenty of bats need to get among the runs or risk the axe.

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Mavrick returns to become top gun

RETURN: Mark Butler’s Mavrick will be put to the test around the Bathurst track as he comes back from a spell. Photo: ZENIO LAPKA 100613zbutlerMAVRICK has been through the wars for Bathurst trainer Mark Butler, but he’ll be hoping that’s all behind his gelding for tonight’s Alabar Bloodstock Pace (1,730 metres).
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The seven-year-old returns from a two-month spell after picking up an injury, but that has nothing on the fracture that kept him out of the game for over 14 months until April this year.

The comeback trail continues for the former listed quality winning runner as he lines up for career start 36 and aims to keep an impressive winning record of one in every three starts.

“He won his last start, which was about two months ago, but he hurt himself. Whatever he does in this race is definitely going to be an improvement,” Butler said.

“I don’t really tell my drivers what to do, I trust that JT [John O’Shea] will do what’s right. There’s a fair bit of speed on his inside so we could hold him up.”

Mavrick goes out from gate six in the eight-horse field for the night’s top-graded and highest prize money ($7,000) race, for C4 to C7 entrants.

The search continues for the peak form that Butler’s Aces N Sevens out of Shooting Blanks gelding had at the end of 2012, which culminated in a Country Series Final win.

There were signs prior to his latest injury that he was making progress towards that goal with a couple of runner-up finishes interstate and a dominant win in his latest start.

“He won six races in a row at one stage there and he found himself going from a C0 to a C6 in the space of just a couple of months but then he hurt himself. It’s going to take a while to get him back to that level again, but I believe we’ve got him back to a competitive level again,” Butler said.

“He loves the bigger tracks and he’s probably one of a few of mine who goes really well at Menangle. We took him up to Queensland in the winter and he had some cracking runs up there too.”

Ashlee Siejka’s Medal Of Honour, though a little out of form of late, could be a threat from gate three while stable mate Packnplenty on his immediate outside carries some nice form. Both also have starts on the new track under their belt.

Bathurst chances are rife through the field with Nathan Hurst carrying three hopes in the race, Classic Croupier, Tulhurst Candy and Major Gambler.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.


Michael Cheika as Wallabies coach: pros and cons

Rupert Guinness takes a look at the prospects of Michael Cheika coaching the Wallabies – from what’s good to what may be a worry.
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The positives

Boasts a winning record in the northern and southern hemispheres with wins in the 2009 Heineken Cup at Leinster and the 2014 Super Rugby competition with the Waratahs. He knows success and how teams in both hemispheres train and play.

Will attract player buy-in, and not just from his Waratahs roster, but from players in the Wallabies squad who come from Australia’s other Super Rugby sides and are excited to experience playing for a coach who turned underachievers into champions.

A straight-talking no-nonsense coach who provides clarity and direction on issues ranging from selection and game strategy to team culture. He doesn’t have to coach the Wallabies because he needs the money or fame. Importantly, he wants to.

Is taking over a team that despite its 29-28 loss on Saturday to the All Blacks has self-belief. They just need more of it to go to play out games. He is a master at bringing the best out of players when even they may doubt they have more.

Will encourage a high-tempo but physical game, such as the Wallabies played on Saturday. Interestingly, the run-on team had six Waratahs – Sekope Kepu, Michael Hooper, Nick Phipps, Bernard Foley, Adam Ashley-Cooper and Israel Folau.

Not afraid to provide opportunity to lower-profile names if they are performing and he feels they have earned it. Similarly, unafraid to drop a player, no matter how big the name. He won’t kowtow to outside pressures to pick players either.

Empowers players with a sense of self-responsibility, on and off the field – to the point that they take it upon themselves to live up to what is expected of them in training, games and after – rather than browbeat them over and over with rules.

He may only have nine games (eight Tests and one Barbarians game) before the World Cup; but there is plenty of time to work on his Wallabies World Cup squad in and around those periods. He won’t waste time on unimportant issues.

Enjoys a laugh. Everyone knows or learns quickly that he is top dog, but when the work is done, treats all staff and players as equals. Can surprise, as he did with his motivational ploys before big games.

Wallabies appointment means Australian rugby is spared his taking the job at Argentina – which courted him – or any other country. Making sure he remains in Australia for three years eliminates fear of a sudden exit after World Cup.

The questions

How will he deal with ARU chief executive Bill Pulver, whose handling of recent affairs has already been questioned? He admits he is not a corporate type and showed that at the Waratahs, where he didn’t take to interference from the top office.

He will want it his way when dealing with the expectation that he will steer the Wallabies to success in a job now likened to a poisoned chalice; and dealing with ARU interference when he feels it should not be there. But after Ewen McKenzie, will the ARU allow that?

His explosive nature. Memories are fresh of him accidentally breaking the coach’s box window after a loss to the Brumbies in Canberra, and his $6000 fine and six-month suspended ban for abusing a cameraman in the Tahs loss to the Sharks in Durban.

Pressure for the Tahs to defend the Super Rugby title will heighten. Robbie Deans coached the Crusaders to the 2008 Super Rugby title before the Wallabies – who won their first five Tests under him – but his tenure was not rated a success.

The potential of a provincial divide created by those who fear a pro-Waratahs push from within the Wallabies – or even from the Sydney-based ARU – come team selections, despite Cheika’s reputation for being his own man.

Improving Wallabies set piece to take on the best scrums and line-outs in the World Cup. Some feel the Waratahs’ scrum was better than the Wallabies’. Too bad Kane Douglas is playing in Ireland and Jacques Potgieter is South African.

Who to select at No. 10? Bernard Foley, a direct runner, whom he helped develop at the Tahs to where he is? Or try for Reds star Quade Cooper, also an attacking pivot but who offers more on-field extravagance and is a better general play kicker.

Embracing Kurtley Beale’s return (if there is one) pending the outcome of his ARU code of conduct tribunal on Friday. Will the progress Beale made off field under Cheika’s watch prove to have been undone? Can he keep him in union? Is it too late?

Michael Hooper led the Waratahs after Dave Dennis was felled by injury, then the Wallabies when Stephen Moore went down in the first Test against France. Will he be better for the experience? Should Moore have it back? Or someone else?

He says he’s not a corporate type. So, how will he fit in to the Wallabies’ suit on game day? Pity the poor tailors who will have to fit him out in a hurry in Sydney before Friday’s departure for the Wallabies’ sprint tour. He doesn’t like to be told what to do.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.


Disability advocates blast post

AUSTRALIA POST take note: your refusal to install a drive-through street postal box for the elderly and disabled has drawn the ire of Disability Discrimination Commissioner Susan Ryan.
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It has also drawn a huge response from ratepayers and readers, many of whom have signed a petition calling for a reversal of the service’s ban on such an installation in Armidale.

The matter was first raised about a year ago, when Armidale Dumaresq councillor Andrew Murat, for the sheer love of it, designed a prototype box allowing the elderly and disabled to post letters and parcels from their vehicles.

But instead of applauding such an idea, Australia Post has ruled out taking up the offer to install the special post box in Armidale.

It claims such an installation could be dangerous to posties clearing mailboxes and also to passing motorists.

It would be difficult to think of sillier reasons for such a refusal.

There is apparently a precedent in Queanbeyan where no such danger is posed to the public or posties.

The fact Australia Post, in its own accessibility action plan of two years ago, espouses a service providing accessible products and services makes its decision over the special postal box even more mysterious.

Maybe Australia Post is hoping the issue will simply fade over time; that people will forget Cr Murat’s prototype and it will be left to gather dust.

No way.

We will be watching and reporting as Ms Ryan takes up the cause of Australia Post’s disabled customers in Armidale.

At the very least we call for a trial of this drive-through street postal box.

What is there to lose?

No more procrastination. Every town in Australia must provide parking for the disabled; why not a postal box, too?

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.


Central Wagga home broken into while family of five asleep

A family of five has been left shaken after their Central Wagga home was broken into while they slept at the weekend. File photoA FAMILY of five has been left shaken after their Central Wagga home was broken into while they slept at the weekend.
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The Brookong Avenue address was targeted in the early hours of Sunday morning, with two wallets and a handbag taken from the kitchen table when entry was gained via a laundry window.

Although physically unharmed, one of the occupants, Jacinta – whose surname has been withheld – says she was frightened by the ordeal.

Jacinta said her partner, two sons and daughterslept through the break-in, but believe it happened between 12.30am and 1.30am.

“We didn’t hear a thing,” Jacinta said.

“They were sort of in and out.

“We had a light on inside and everything, I’m sure they would have realised someone was home.”

Another bag – which contained cash – was left untouched in the lounge room, as was an expensive watch.

“It sort of looked like they were looking for money,” she said.

The family’s dog was also let out.

Jacinta fears those responsible returned on Monday night, with a mobile phone heard ringing near the house.

Investigations revealed neither Jacinta or her partner’s phone had rung that night.

Wagga police yesterday confirmed another house in the street was also broken into on Saturday night.

Crime manager Detective Inspector Darren Cloake said the incidents followed a number of offences in the Forest Hill area earlier this year, where brazen thieves snuck into the bedrooms and stole keys to vehicles and homes.

Inspector Cloake said four groups of offenders were “running around at the moment”, including one of three 13-year-olds in the Tolland area who were “breaking in day and night”.

Others are active on Pinaroo Drive and Naretha Street in Glenfield Park.

“All break and enters are of concern to us, especially when there’s the potential for offenders to be startled and for victims to be confronted,” Inspector Cloake said.

“If there’s any indication a person, or persons, are acting suspiciously … call us, we will respond.”

Inspector Cloake urged people seeking reprieve from the summer heat by opening a window to use extra caution.

“That presents as an opportunity for these people to do that (break in),” he said.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.


Great score secures win for Thomson and Magill

Troy Thomson (left), and Peter Magill (right) were congratulated by Life Members Paul Thomas and Wally Norman at the presentation of the Life Members trophy day. subA great field of 86 members contested Saturday’s Life Members sponsored two person Ambrose that saw some red hot scoring.
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Troy Thomson and Peter Magill took home the spoils of victory after recording a great 61.5 nett.

In accepting their trophies from Life Member Wally Norman, both Thomson and Magill congratulated all the club’s dedicated Life Members for their commitment and for helping make the club what it is today.

Runners-up and leading home the ladies section were Anita Medcalf and Leone Stevenson who recorded a solid 65.5 nett.

Wally Norman, in representing the surviving Life Members of Lionel Grady, Cliff Cowell, Trish Wyatt and Paul Thomas, stated it was a pleasure to sponsor the event.

He stated it was the first time in three years since he contested an 18 hole event and he enjoyed the day immensely.

Wally especially enjoyed playing in the same group as Blake Parker and said to watch him hit the ball was inspiring.

Ball winners were 62 Mitch McGlashan and Wayne Powter, 62.5 Blake and George Parker, 62.75 Greg Powter and Mal Westcott, 63 Paul Massurit and Paul Morgan, 63.5 John Davies and Jim Buckley, and Robert Hey and John Pearce, 63.75 Jack Cole and Wayne Tucker, and Ron Klein and Garry Phillips.

In nearest the pin awards, Vince Kelly started in great fashion when he claimed the Idlerite Tyrepower 1st hole at 210cm, narrowly missing out on a percentage of the jackpot.

Steve Edmonds fired a superb 7-iron to just 77cm to win the Griffins Leading Edge 4th hole. Ron Klein added to his ball collection when he fired a well hit 3-wood to within 309cm of the flag on the Dirt Doctor Landscaping 6th hole.

On the back nine, Steve Simpson fired a lovely 7-iron to within birdie range at 178cm on the Harvey Norman 11th hole.

On the final par three, the tough Westlime sponsored 15th hole, Ian Phipps at 351cm gained the accolades.

The day’s final two awards on the best-in-two-shots final holes of each nine saw Robert Hey birdie the Parkes Ready Mixed Concrete 9th hole after his second shot finished 73cm from the pin.

On the Parkes Heavy Mechanical Repairs 18th hole, Brian L Hogan hit the shot of his life to come within 12cm of an eagle as he collected the two golf balls on offer.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.


BMX: Bike gift gives Alsop new edge

IN A SPIN: Kimberley Alsop with the new BMX bike this week. Picture: Jamieson MurphyBMX young gun Kimberley Alsop has a new set of wheels thanks to the generosity of local businesses and community groups.
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Southlakes Old Boys, Prestige Smash Repairs, South Lake Macquarie RSL sub-branch, Cheeky Bikes and Advance Traders all pulled together to get Kimberley a top-of-the-line bike.

The Silverwater resident was previously racing on a bike bought second-hand for her older sister five years ago.

Kimberley thanked everyone involved in the collaborative effort and said the support means a great deal.

“Hopefully the new bike will help me get closer to achieving my goals,” she said.

Among those goals is a strong performance in the Lake Macquarie team to contest the Lake Macquarie International Children’s Games in December.

Once Kimberley received the bike, she had a week to get used to it before racing in the NSW BMX State Titles in Elderslie.

Her mum Melissa said adapting to the new bike in under a week was a big effort and compared it to a V8 Supercar driver jumping in a new car for the first time.

The first time Kimberley took the new bike for a spin around the Argenton BMX track she was going so fast she came off over the handle bars.

Despite the tumble she pulled herself together and resumed practising.

At the state titles, Kimberley finished third in the cruisers and fifth in the 20-inch division.

“She’s always had the skill level to be competitive, now she’s got the competitive edge on the bike as well,” Ms Alsop said.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.


Gough Whitlam’s free university education reforms led to legacy of no upfront fees

A generation of Australians will forever remember Gough Whitlam as the man who gave them a free university education. Whitlam’s abolition of university fees cemented him as a Labor folk hero yet his higher education legacy remains contested and contradictory.
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In a pre-election speech in Bankstown in 1972, Whitlam said: “We believe that a student’s merit, rather than a parent’s wealth, should decide who should benefit from the community’s vast financial commitment to tertiary education.”

Surprisingly, the Australian Union of Students lobbied for fees to be retained – reportedly because the students believed making higher education free would redistribute resources to those who did not need them.

Nevertheless, the Whitlam government abolished university fees in 1974. The policy would remain in place for 14 years, including the entire life of the Fraser government.

Whitlam also gave the Commonwealth full control over university funding and introduced a system of student income support that survives today through Youth Allowance, Austudy and Abstudy.

While more working-class students and women attended university, the introduction of free higher education did not lead to a dramatic change in the composition of university enrolments. That’s because most working-class Australians did not complete high school, meaning university was not an option for them. And about 80 per cent of students had not paid fees anyway because they were covered by Commonwealth scholarships and other subsidies.

While free higher education remained popular, by the late 1980s senior members of the Hawke government were determined to unwind it. More students were finishing year 12, leading to a growing queue of prospective students. Funding the entire cost of their education would place a significant burden on the budget. It would also be regressive, higher education minister John Dawkins concluded, because most university students came from well-off backgrounds and would earn more over a lifetime because of their degree.

In 1989, Labor established HECS, meaning students would pay tuition fees but only when earning a decent wage.

The Abbott government is now proposing allowing universities to charge students as much as they want for a degree.

While Australia is moving ever further away from the era of no university fees, Bruce Chapman, the architect of the HECS scheme, says Whitlam’s impact should not be underestimated.

“Whitlam’s higher education agenda and Dawkins’ had one thing in common: to take away any need for people to find money to enrol in university,” Chapman says. “Gough Whitlam left a legacy of a system without upfront fees that has lasted for 40 years.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.


Gough Whitlam left a long list of achievements

Gough Whitlam is perhaps best known for the manner in which he prematurely exited from power rather than how he chose to wield it
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But wield it he did. Whitlam’s short three-year shelf life as prime minister is generally recognised as one of Australia’s most reforming governments.

Conservative government has been the norm in Australian politics since federation and the preference is for reform by increment rather than by rush. Consequently, much of what Gough Whitlam built – such as a free university education – has been torn down by successive governments on both sides of the political spectrum.

But what remains continues to shape Australia’s national life like a guardian angel. Here is some of the Whitlam legacy:

● His government extricated Australia from the Vietnam War and abolished conscription. Australia had been fighting in South Vietnam since 1962. Two years later conscription was introduced but the first wave of baby boomers rebelled and eventually they, and their elders, took to the streets in moratorium nationwide marches that saw mass civil disobedience reflect the prevailing view. Labor’s anti-war policy became one of Whitlam’s most powerful election campaign assets.

● Whitlam took the demonology out of foreign policy, recognising China after the Coalition had refused contact with Beijing for 24 years. Whitlam ripped the rug from beneath Bill McMahon when he led a Labor delegation to China in July 1971 and the Coalition prime minister accused him of being a Communist pawn only to see United States President Richard Nixon announce his proposed visit to China a week later. Whitlam also attempted to redefine the alliance with the US.

● Medibank, the precursor to Medicare, was established.

● Social welfare reforms included the supporting mother’s benefit and welfare payment for homeless people. Before 1973 only widows were entitled to pension payments, so other women who were raising children alone faced invidious choices. But the pension payment gave single mothers choices and options around the raising of their children. It also helped remove old stigmas around single mothers.

● Equal pay for women: One of the first acts of the Whitlam government was to reopen the National Wage and Equal Pay cases at the Commonwealth Conciliation and Arbitration Commission. The 1972 Equal Pay case meant that Australian women doing work similar to that done by men should be paid an equal wage. Two years later the commission extended the adult minimum wage to include women workers for the first time.

● The Postmaster-General’s Department was replaced by the twin-headed Telecom and Australia Post.

● The Australian Legal Office and Australian Law Reform Commission were set up.

● The death penalty for Commonwealth offences was abolished. Melbourne escapee Ronald Ryan was the last man executed in Australia on February 3, 1967, for shooting a prison guard. Victoria and some state governments (not NSW which abolished capital punishment for murder in 1955) remained proponents of the death penalty. Whitlam’s reforms led to the 2010 federal legislation prohibiting the reinstatement of capital punishment in all Australian states and territories.

● The Family Law Act providing for a national Family Court was enacted, and simplified, non-punitive divorce laws were introduced.

● The Whitlam government also established needs-based funding for schools after appointing Peter Karmel to head a committee examining the position of government and non-government primary and secondary schools throughout Australia. Karmel’s report identified many inequities in the funding system, which for the first time led to the federal government providing funding to state schools.

● A free university education was briefly available to all Australians. In Whitlam’s three years of government, participation in higher education increased by 25 per cent, to 276,559 enrolments. The main beneficiaries were women.

● Amid widespread business and union opposition, in 1973 the Australian economy was opened to the world by a 25 per cent cut in tariffs across the board. An early forerunner of the Productivity Commission was established as was the Trade Practices Act and a predecessor of the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission.

● The Australian Assistance Plan to fund regional councils and employment projects continues in the concepts of “social planning” and “community development”.

● The National Sewerage Program connected suburban homes to sewerage. The government spent $330 million on the program before it was cancelled by the Fraser government but in Sydney the backlog of unsewered properties fell from 158,884 in 1973 to 95,505 in 1978. Similarly, in Melbourne, the backlog was reduced from 160,000 in 1972-73, to 88,000 in 1978-79.

● The Whitlam government reduced the voting age to 18 and provided the Northern Territory and Australian Capital Territory with representation in the Senate.

● It replaced God Save the Queen with Advance Australia Fair as the national anthem.

● Queen Elizabeth became Queen of Australia when she signed her assent to The Royal Style and Titles Act 1973. The legislation also deleted the traditional reference to the Queen as Head of the Church of England by removing “Defender of the Faith” from her Australian titles.

● An Order of Australia replaced the British Honours system.

● The Racial Discrimination Act 1975 conferred rights to equality before the law and bound the Commonwealth and the states to the International Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Racial Discrimination.

● The Department of Aboriginal Affairs was set up and the first Commonwealth legislation to grant land rights to indigenous people was drafted. The subsequent Malcolm Fraser government passed the legislation.

● Land title deeds were handed to some Gurindji traditional lands owners in the Northern Territory in 1975, a real and symbolic gesture that became a touchstone for the land rights movement.

● The Whitlam government also established the National Gallery of Australia, the Australia Council for the Arts, the Australian Heritage Commission. It introduced FM radio, pushed for the setting up of 2JJ, a radio established to support Australian music and connect with young Australians. It set up multicultural radio services – 2EA Sydney and 3EA in Melbourne – and issued licences to community radio stations for the first time.

● The Australian film industry flowered and the Australian Film and Television School, an idea of a previous Coalition prime minister, John Gorton, was opened.

● The reorganisation and modernisation of Labor’s policy platform saved the ALP from its past.

● Papua New Guinea became independent on September 16, 1975, after being administered from Australia since the First World War.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.