Central Wagga home broken into while family of five asleep

A family of five has been left shaken after their Central Wagga home was broken into while they slept at the weekend. File photoA FAMILY of five has been left shaken after their Central Wagga home was broken into while they slept at the weekend.
苏州美甲美睫培训学校

The Brookong Avenue address was targeted in the early hours of Sunday morning, with two wallets and a handbag taken from the kitchen table when entry was gained via a laundry window.

Although physically unharmed, one of the occupants, Jacinta – whose surname has been withheld – says she was frightened by the ordeal.

Jacinta said her partner, two sons and daughterslept through the break-in, but believe it happened between 12.30am and 1.30am.

“We didn’t hear a thing,” Jacinta said.

“They were sort of in and out.

“We had a light on inside and everything, I’m sure they would have realised someone was home.”

Another bag – which contained cash – was left untouched in the lounge room, as was an expensive watch.

“It sort of looked like they were looking for money,” she said.

The family’s dog was also let out.

Jacinta fears those responsible returned on Monday night, with a mobile phone heard ringing near the house.

Investigations revealed neither Jacinta or her partner’s phone had rung that night.

Wagga police yesterday confirmed another house in the street was also broken into on Saturday night.

Crime manager Detective Inspector Darren Cloake said the incidents followed a number of offences in the Forest Hill area earlier this year, where brazen thieves snuck into the bedrooms and stole keys to vehicles and homes.

Inspector Cloake said four groups of offenders were “running around at the moment”, including one of three 13-year-olds in the Tolland area who were “breaking in day and night”.

Others are active on Pinaroo Drive and Naretha Street in Glenfield Park.

“All break and enters are of concern to us, especially when there’s the potential for offenders to be startled and for victims to be confronted,” Inspector Cloake said.

“If there’s any indication a person, or persons, are acting suspiciously … call us, we will respond.”

Inspector Cloake urged people seeking reprieve from the summer heat by opening a window to use extra caution.

“That presents as an opportunity for these people to do that (break in),” he said.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 苏州美甲美睫培训学校.


Great score secures win for Thomson and Magill

Troy Thomson (left), and Peter Magill (right) were congratulated by Life Members Paul Thomas and Wally Norman at the presentation of the Life Members trophy day. subA great field of 86 members contested Saturday’s Life Members sponsored two person Ambrose that saw some red hot scoring.
苏州美甲美睫培训学校

Troy Thomson and Peter Magill took home the spoils of victory after recording a great 61.5 nett.

In accepting their trophies from Life Member Wally Norman, both Thomson and Magill congratulated all the club’s dedicated Life Members for their commitment and for helping make the club what it is today.

Runners-up and leading home the ladies section were Anita Medcalf and Leone Stevenson who recorded a solid 65.5 nett.

Wally Norman, in representing the surviving Life Members of Lionel Grady, Cliff Cowell, Trish Wyatt and Paul Thomas, stated it was a pleasure to sponsor the event.

He stated it was the first time in three years since he contested an 18 hole event and he enjoyed the day immensely.

Wally especially enjoyed playing in the same group as Blake Parker and said to watch him hit the ball was inspiring.

Ball winners were 62 Mitch McGlashan and Wayne Powter, 62.5 Blake and George Parker, 62.75 Greg Powter and Mal Westcott, 63 Paul Massurit and Paul Morgan, 63.5 John Davies and Jim Buckley, and Robert Hey and John Pearce, 63.75 Jack Cole and Wayne Tucker, and Ron Klein and Garry Phillips.

In nearest the pin awards, Vince Kelly started in great fashion when he claimed the Idlerite Tyrepower 1st hole at 210cm, narrowly missing out on a percentage of the jackpot.

Steve Edmonds fired a superb 7-iron to just 77cm to win the Griffins Leading Edge 4th hole. Ron Klein added to his ball collection when he fired a well hit 3-wood to within 309cm of the flag on the Dirt Doctor Landscaping 6th hole.

On the back nine, Steve Simpson fired a lovely 7-iron to within birdie range at 178cm on the Harvey Norman 11th hole.

On the final par three, the tough Westlime sponsored 15th hole, Ian Phipps at 351cm gained the accolades.

The day’s final two awards on the best-in-two-shots final holes of each nine saw Robert Hey birdie the Parkes Ready Mixed Concrete 9th hole after his second shot finished 73cm from the pin.

On the Parkes Heavy Mechanical Repairs 18th hole, Brian L Hogan hit the shot of his life to come within 12cm of an eagle as he collected the two golf balls on offer.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 苏州美甲美睫培训学校.


BMX: Bike gift gives Alsop new edge

IN A SPIN: Kimberley Alsop with the new BMX bike this week. Picture: Jamieson MurphyBMX young gun Kimberley Alsop has a new set of wheels thanks to the generosity of local businesses and community groups.
苏州美甲美睫培训学校

Southlakes Old Boys, Prestige Smash Repairs, South Lake Macquarie RSL sub-branch, Cheeky Bikes and Advance Traders all pulled together to get Kimberley a top-of-the-line bike.

The Silverwater resident was previously racing on a bike bought second-hand for her older sister five years ago.

Kimberley thanked everyone involved in the collaborative effort and said the support means a great deal.

“Hopefully the new bike will help me get closer to achieving my goals,” she said.

Among those goals is a strong performance in the Lake Macquarie team to contest the Lake Macquarie International Children’s Games in December.

Once Kimberley received the bike, she had a week to get used to it before racing in the NSW BMX State Titles in Elderslie.

Her mum Melissa said adapting to the new bike in under a week was a big effort and compared it to a V8 Supercar driver jumping in a new car for the first time.

The first time Kimberley took the new bike for a spin around the Argenton BMX track she was going so fast she came off over the handle bars.

Despite the tumble she pulled herself together and resumed practising.

At the state titles, Kimberley finished third in the cruisers and fifth in the 20-inch division.

“She’s always had the skill level to be competitive, now she’s got the competitive edge on the bike as well,” Ms Alsop said.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 苏州美甲美睫培训学校.


Gough Whitlam’s free university education reforms led to legacy of no upfront fees

A generation of Australians will forever remember Gough Whitlam as the man who gave them a free university education. Whitlam’s abolition of university fees cemented him as a Labor folk hero yet his higher education legacy remains contested and contradictory.
苏州美甲美睫培训学校

In a pre-election speech in Bankstown in 1972, Whitlam said: “We believe that a student’s merit, rather than a parent’s wealth, should decide who should benefit from the community’s vast financial commitment to tertiary education.”

Surprisingly, the Australian Union of Students lobbied for fees to be retained – reportedly because the students believed making higher education free would redistribute resources to those who did not need them.

Nevertheless, the Whitlam government abolished university fees in 1974. The policy would remain in place for 14 years, including the entire life of the Fraser government.

Whitlam also gave the Commonwealth full control over university funding and introduced a system of student income support that survives today through Youth Allowance, Austudy and Abstudy.

While more working-class students and women attended university, the introduction of free higher education did not lead to a dramatic change in the composition of university enrolments. That’s because most working-class Australians did not complete high school, meaning university was not an option for them. And about 80 per cent of students had not paid fees anyway because they were covered by Commonwealth scholarships and other subsidies.

While free higher education remained popular, by the late 1980s senior members of the Hawke government were determined to unwind it. More students were finishing year 12, leading to a growing queue of prospective students. Funding the entire cost of their education would place a significant burden on the budget. It would also be regressive, higher education minister John Dawkins concluded, because most university students came from well-off backgrounds and would earn more over a lifetime because of their degree.

In 1989, Labor established HECS, meaning students would pay tuition fees but only when earning a decent wage.

The Abbott government is now proposing allowing universities to charge students as much as they want for a degree.

While Australia is moving ever further away from the era of no university fees, Bruce Chapman, the architect of the HECS scheme, says Whitlam’s impact should not be underestimated.

“Whitlam’s higher education agenda and Dawkins’ had one thing in common: to take away any need for people to find money to enrol in university,” Chapman says. “Gough Whitlam left a legacy of a system without upfront fees that has lasted for 40 years.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 苏州美甲美睫培训学校.


Gough Whitlam left a long list of achievements

Gough Whitlam is perhaps best known for the manner in which he prematurely exited from power rather than how he chose to wield it
苏州美甲美睫培训学校

But wield it he did. Whitlam’s short three-year shelf life as prime minister is generally recognised as one of Australia’s most reforming governments.

Conservative government has been the norm in Australian politics since federation and the preference is for reform by increment rather than by rush. Consequently, much of what Gough Whitlam built – such as a free university education – has been torn down by successive governments on both sides of the political spectrum.

But what remains continues to shape Australia’s national life like a guardian angel. Here is some of the Whitlam legacy:

● His government extricated Australia from the Vietnam War and abolished conscription. Australia had been fighting in South Vietnam since 1962. Two years later conscription was introduced but the first wave of baby boomers rebelled and eventually they, and their elders, took to the streets in moratorium nationwide marches that saw mass civil disobedience reflect the prevailing view. Labor’s anti-war policy became one of Whitlam’s most powerful election campaign assets.

● Whitlam took the demonology out of foreign policy, recognising China after the Coalition had refused contact with Beijing for 24 years. Whitlam ripped the rug from beneath Bill McMahon when he led a Labor delegation to China in July 1971 and the Coalition prime minister accused him of being a Communist pawn only to see United States President Richard Nixon announce his proposed visit to China a week later. Whitlam also attempted to redefine the alliance with the US.

● Medibank, the precursor to Medicare, was established.

● Social welfare reforms included the supporting mother’s benefit and welfare payment for homeless people. Before 1973 only widows were entitled to pension payments, so other women who were raising children alone faced invidious choices. But the pension payment gave single mothers choices and options around the raising of their children. It also helped remove old stigmas around single mothers.

● Equal pay for women: One of the first acts of the Whitlam government was to reopen the National Wage and Equal Pay cases at the Commonwealth Conciliation and Arbitration Commission. The 1972 Equal Pay case meant that Australian women doing work similar to that done by men should be paid an equal wage. Two years later the commission extended the adult minimum wage to include women workers for the first time.

● The Postmaster-General’s Department was replaced by the twin-headed Telecom and Australia Post.

● The Australian Legal Office and Australian Law Reform Commission were set up.

● The death penalty for Commonwealth offences was abolished. Melbourne escapee Ronald Ryan was the last man executed in Australia on February 3, 1967, for shooting a prison guard. Victoria and some state governments (not NSW which abolished capital punishment for murder in 1955) remained proponents of the death penalty. Whitlam’s reforms led to the 2010 federal legislation prohibiting the reinstatement of capital punishment in all Australian states and territories.

● The Family Law Act providing for a national Family Court was enacted, and simplified, non-punitive divorce laws were introduced.

● The Whitlam government also established needs-based funding for schools after appointing Peter Karmel to head a committee examining the position of government and non-government primary and secondary schools throughout Australia. Karmel’s report identified many inequities in the funding system, which for the first time led to the federal government providing funding to state schools.

● A free university education was briefly available to all Australians. In Whitlam’s three years of government, participation in higher education increased by 25 per cent, to 276,559 enrolments. The main beneficiaries were women.

● Amid widespread business and union opposition, in 1973 the Australian economy was opened to the world by a 25 per cent cut in tariffs across the board. An early forerunner of the Productivity Commission was established as was the Trade Practices Act and a predecessor of the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission.

● The Australian Assistance Plan to fund regional councils and employment projects continues in the concepts of “social planning” and “community development”.

● The National Sewerage Program connected suburban homes to sewerage. The government spent $330 million on the program before it was cancelled by the Fraser government but in Sydney the backlog of unsewered properties fell from 158,884 in 1973 to 95,505 in 1978. Similarly, in Melbourne, the backlog was reduced from 160,000 in 1972-73, to 88,000 in 1978-79.

● The Whitlam government reduced the voting age to 18 and provided the Northern Territory and Australian Capital Territory with representation in the Senate.

● It replaced God Save the Queen with Advance Australia Fair as the national anthem.

● Queen Elizabeth became Queen of Australia when she signed her assent to The Royal Style and Titles Act 1973. The legislation also deleted the traditional reference to the Queen as Head of the Church of England by removing “Defender of the Faith” from her Australian titles.

● An Order of Australia replaced the British Honours system.

● The Racial Discrimination Act 1975 conferred rights to equality before the law and bound the Commonwealth and the states to the International Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Racial Discrimination.

● The Department of Aboriginal Affairs was set up and the first Commonwealth legislation to grant land rights to indigenous people was drafted. The subsequent Malcolm Fraser government passed the legislation.

● Land title deeds were handed to some Gurindji traditional lands owners in the Northern Territory in 1975, a real and symbolic gesture that became a touchstone for the land rights movement.

● The Whitlam government also established the National Gallery of Australia, the Australia Council for the Arts, the Australian Heritage Commission. It introduced FM radio, pushed for the setting up of 2JJ, a radio established to support Australian music and connect with young Australians. It set up multicultural radio services – 2EA Sydney and 3EA in Melbourne – and issued licences to community radio stations for the first time.

● The Australian film industry flowered and the Australian Film and Television School, an idea of a previous Coalition prime minister, John Gorton, was opened.

● The reorganisation and modernisation of Labor’s policy platform saved the ALP from its past.

● Papua New Guinea became independent on September 16, 1975, after being administered from Australia since the First World War.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 苏州美甲美睫培训学校.


Sir John Kerr came off worse in the dismissal of Gough Whitlam’s government

When Sir John Kerr presented the 1977 Melbourne Cup, it was almost exactly two years since he had committed his constitutional faux pas. He was dapper in a a three-piece suit and, it seemed, awfully drunk.
苏州美甲美睫培训学校

His obvious inebriation, combined with his thicket of white hair and his aristocratic bearing, made him seem more like a Barry Humphries’ character than the governor-general.

The crowd hissed as he tottered through his speech.

“Any little noises that you may happen to hear are only static,” he proclaimed. “It’s just something wrong with the system.

“Cheers from a small minority! However, life is wonderful for all of us.”

Whitlam later said Kerr was a “drunk” and he made an mistake in appointing him.

The irony is that Kerr, much more so than Whitlam, was a true working-class man. Born in Balmain, the son of a boilermaker, he won a scholarship to Sydney University, where he studied law and won the university medal.

He later became a member of the Labor Party and a a protege of Labor great H.V.Evatt as he forged a brilliant legal career. He was made chief justice of NSW in 1972, and in 1974, after a period of negotiation with Whitlam, he was announced as governor-general-designate.

Whitlam thought he knew was he was getting: a Labor man. But Kerr’s political views had evolved and he had firm views on the exercise of the governor-general’s reserve powers.

Sir John will always be viewed by many as the villain of the extraordinary 1975 story. He was also a former intelligence officer, leading some to believe his role in the dismissal was part of an intelligence conspiracy.

Following the dismissal,Whitlam and his supporters denigrated him, and he was often abused when he appeared in public, even after he left his vice-regal role.

He eventually moved to London to escape the public disapprobation, where, according to historian Phillip Knightley, he “could be seen most days, usually the worse for wear, at one or other gentleman’s club”.

He died in 1991. His family did not request a state funeral, which would have been his due as a former governor-general.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 苏州美甲美睫培训学校.


Gough Whitlam’s foreign affairs legacy was to give Australia a new independence

Diplomatic vision: Gough Whitlam meeting Communist Party chairman Mao Zedong in China in 1973. Photo: National ArchivesHistory judges Gough Whitlam got China and Vietnam right – and East Timor so tragically wrong.
苏州美甲美睫培训学校

Yet his enduring legacy, far beyond individual relationships, was to infuse a greater sense of independence into Australia’s approach to the world.

Whitlam ended military conscription and formally withdrew Australia from the Vietnam War.

He switched Australia’s vote at the United Nations to oppose the white minority regime in then Rhodesia, and hastily ushered Papua New Guinea to independence.

He dominated his government’s foreign policy, remaining both prime minister and foreign minister for much of his term.

But it was diplomatic recognition of communist China that most embodied Whitlam’s vision for Australia to decide its own fate.

“It was a risk because it was going against the policy of the United States, which was about to change too, but no one knew,” said Stephen FitzGerald on Tuesday.

FitzGerald was just 34 when Whitlam made him Australia’s first ambassador to China. The controversy of recognition seems hard to fathom now, especially with China as Australia’s largest trade partner.

But at the time, Whitlam made his visit to Beijing in opposition, and conservative politicians frothed at his “instant coffee” diplomacy and the threat to the US alliance – only for Richard Nixon to go to China a few months later.

University of Sydney historian James Curran believes Whitlam ranks as the leader best prepared in foreign affairs to come to office in the post-war era.

“He clearly revelled in his role as international statesman and there can be no doubt he carried it off with considerable aplomb,” Curran said.

But in a book to be released next year, Unholy Fury: Nixon and Whitlam at War, Curran has unearthed new evidence to show the Americans, incensed by Whitlam’s policies, almost abandoned the treaty with Australia and even costed withdrawing US bases.

Veteran diplomat Richard Woolcott said Whitlam was determined for Australia to be independent within the framework of the alliance, but had to manage a Labor left faction declaring he should not meet the White House “maniac” bombing Vietnam.

Whitlam’s extensive overseas trips, including long sojourns across more than a dozen nations, became the subject of ridicule back home.

Woolcott remembers Whitlam reading in the newspaper about newly independent Bangladesh, Guinea-Bissau and Grenada joining the UN, and quipping: “Having you seen this, comrade? They are creating these countries faster than I can visit them.”

But as his government was overwhelmed by political and economic problems at home, Whitlam’s mistake was not to recognise the determination of the people of East Timor to join the ranks of independent nations.

Indonesia’s violent takeover of the former Portuguese colony, and the debate over whether Whitlam gave the “green light” to Indonesian dictator Suharto, left a stain on what was otherwise a time Australia’s flag waved anew.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 苏州美甲美睫培训学校.


Whitlam and conscription – an end to the lottery of death

Gough Whitlam speaking at a Vietnam peace rally in in 1965. Photo: John O’GreadyIt was called the lottery of death.
苏州美甲美睫培训学校

From 1964 until 1972, 20-year-old Australian men had to register for the national service scheme where, twice a year, a ballot was held to decide who would be called up.

If a man’s birth date was randomly drawn from a barrel, two years of full-time service in the army beckoned, which from 1966 could also mean combat duties in Vietnam, according to the government’s commemoration website.

Over the eight years of the scheme, more than 15,000 national servicemen served in Vietnam. Two hundred lost their lives.

Among the Whitlam ministry’s first acts after it was sworn in was to release the seven men who were in jail for resisting the draft, Sydney University associate professor James Curran said.

The pending prosecutions for 350 other draft resisters were also dropped and conscription was ended in December 1972. Australia then withdrew its remaining military advisers from Vietnam.

“The lottery of death was abolished,” associate professor Curran said. He is writing a book on the US alliance under Mr Whitlam, Unholy Fury, to be published next year.

Monash University associate professor in politics Paul Strangio said there is no doubt Whitlam’s actions were a “powerful symbolic moment”.

“It lifted an enormous millstone off a generation,” he said.

But he and associate professor Curran cautioned that the issue of conscription was a complex one for Gough Whitlam and for Labor.

While public opposition to the Vietnam War and conscription built to a fever pitch in the late 1960s and early 1970s, there was little opposition in the early years of Australia’s involvement in the conflict.

“Whitlam was always mindful of trying to navigate public opinion [on it],” associate professor Strangio said.

He said Australia had already begun disengaging from Vietnam under the Coalition. Liberal prime minister William McMahon withdrew Australia’s combat troops at the end of 1971.

Associate professor Curran also pointed out that Mr Whitlam had broken with then Labor leader Arthur Calwell on the issue before the 1966 federal election.

Mr Calwell had wanted to bring home all conscripts from Vietnam and withdraw the remaining regulars in consultation with the United States. Mr Whitlam instead argued that if further Australian participation in Vietnam was needed, the regular army would be used, confusing Labor’s public position.

“Whitlam had to walk that fine line between opposing the war, but also maintaining support for the US alliance,” associate professor Curran said.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 苏州美甲美睫培训学校.


Whitlam v Nixon: the cables that reveal Australia’s relations with US at breaking point

President Nixon meets with Gough Whitlam in the Oval Office at the White House in 1973. Photo: Yorba Linda via Nixon Presidential Library
苏州美甲美睫培训学校

President Nixon meets with Gough Whitlam in the Oval Office at the White House in 1973. Photo: Yorba Linda via Nixon Presidential Library

President Nixon meets with Gough Whitlam in the Oval Office at the White House in 1973. Photo: Yorba Linda via Nixon Presidential Library

President Nixon meets with Gough Whitlam in the Oval Office at the White House in 1973. Photo: Yorba Linda via Nixon Presidential Library

EXCLUSIVEGough Whitlam deadGough Whitlam’s memorable quotesFull coverage

Prime Minister Gough Whitlam’s foreign policy prowess was remembered by politicians and commentators around the world on Tuesday.

But to the world’s biggest superpower, the rise of Australia in the Asia-Pacific signalled a threat to US hegemony.

Australia’s relations with the US were at breaking point under Gough Whitlam, excerpts from a yet to be released book have revealed.

According to diplomatic cables obtained by an academic at the University of Sydney, President Nixon ordered a top secret US national security study into cutting all intelligence-sharing operations with Australia in the final year of his doomed presidency.

The breaking point was reached after more than 18 months of diplomatic mistrust, said James Curran, the author of Unholy Fury: Whitlam and Nixon’s Alliance Crisis

“The book draws on sensational new evidence to show just how close Australia came to losing the alliance with the US,” the lecturer from the University of Sydney’s United States Studies Centre said.

Diplomatic cables from the White House reveal that President Nixon labelled the prime minister a “whirling dervish” and a “peacenik, who is certainly putting the Australians on a very, very dangerous path”.

Tape recordings from the White House also show that President Nixon and Secretary of State Henry Kissinger agreed to “freeze” Whitlam “for a few months” so that he would “get the message”.

The escalation in tension came after Mr Whitlam’s vocal opposition to the Vietnam war, which he had opposed since the US had invaded in 1965.

When Mr Whitlam assumed office in 1972, he wrote a protest letter to President Nixon, urging him to de-escalate the conflict.

He also condemned the Christmas bombings by the US of civilian areas in Vietnam.

The last straw came when Whitlam’s minister for labour and immigration, Clyde Cameron, said the White House was “full of maniacs”.

Mr Whitlam’s attitude was described as an “absolute outrage” and a “cheap little manoeuvre” by President Nixon.

“From the minute the Vietnam war ends,” he quipped, the Australians “will need us one hell of a lot more than we need them.”

“For Whitlam to imperil his country’s relations with the United States,” he said, was “one hell of a thing to do.”

Despite the jovial appearance of President Nixon and Mr Whitlam during a 1973 visit to the White House by the prime minister, the diplomatic tension was simmering deep beneath the surface, said Professor Curran.

“Whitlam was just moving too quickly in the Asia-Pacific region with his style of foreign policy,” said Professor Curran.

“This included very strategic moves towards China.

“They couldn’t stand Australia being more independent … It was a period characterised by alarm and hysteria.”

One month after President Nixon ordered his intelligence agencies to explore options for leaving Australia, the Watergate scandal engulfed his presidency.

He became the only US president to be forced to resign from office.

Two years later, Whitlam became the only Australian prime minister to be dismissed by the Governor-General.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 苏州美甲美睫培训学校.


Staff perks aren’t confined to Google

Google is famous for the perks it offers its employees. Staff at the Googleplex in California get free onsite haircuts, can take a dip in one of the swimming pools (complete with lifeguard), play ping pong, billiards, foosball, or have their dry cleaning done for free.
苏州美甲美睫培训学校

But you don’t have to be one of the world’s biggest tech companies to show your employees how much you value them and motivate them to achieve bigger and better things.

At Xero, we believe a happy workplace is a motivated and productive workplace. As a disruptive business which is rewriting the rules of accounting and giving small business owners control over their finances, we need our team to be creative and empowered.

Even small businesses with only a handful of staff can do some of the things we do to foster a positive workplace culture.

We make a point of recognising achievements. Sometimes we do it in a small and informal way, with a pat on the back from a supervisor or by sharing praise from a customer across the company.

Other times it’s more structured. We have a quarterly awards ceremony where I reward employees for exemplary work with a fine dining voucher for two, and once a year those who really overachieve are rewarded with a trip to Hawaii with the senior executive team.

Try the same approach in your business. If someone’s done a good job on a project or solved a difficult problem, gather the team around, outline the good job they’ve done and lead a round of applause. You might think it’s just a round of applause, but people thrive on recognition.

For bigger achievements like winning new business or working overtime to meet a tough deadline, buy them a gift. Luckily as a small business owner, you’ll know your staff well enough to know if they’d prefer a voucher for a manicure or a nice bottle of wine. Then gather the staff around and celebrate their achievement.

At Xero, we also like to create a team culture and celebrate achievements of the whole business. Earlier this year we threw a party in the Melbourne office to celebrate reaching 100,000 customers in Australia, and had dinner and drinks catered by food trucks, and music delivered by employees forming the Xero in-house band, known as ‘Xero Talent’. In fact, we’re lucky to have an over-representation of musical talent at Xero. I store my own PA system and guitar amps in the office, so we’re ready for the occasional spontaneous Friday night jam session.

For a small business, a food truck obviously wouldn’t be an economical way of feeding your staff, but you can still celebrate achievements. Take the staff out for lunch on a Friday when they’ve been working really hard or have lunch delivered to their desks from time to time.

Employees who spend time together work better together, so you can do things like organise an occasional trip to the movies or a football match. Our social club, the Xero Good Times Crew, is run by the staff, who come up with their own ideas for outings, everything from yoga and gym sessions, to lunches and ski weekends.

We also have a pool table and café-standard coffee machine in the break room. And to help staff get the best possible coffee they can we put them all through barista training. That means that instead of everyone wandering off to a café to buy their coffee, there are lots of impromptu social gatherings around the coffee machine.

Here are a few other perks for your staff, which won’t break the bank:

If your workplace can accommodate it, let people bring their dog to work or have a weekly Bring your Dog to Work Day. Pet owners see this as a major workplace perk.

If you can, let valued employees work flexibly so they can pick up their children or meet other commitments. This is a major benefit that employees value highly. Likewise, can employees work from home for one or two days a week? Anyone with a long commute will jump at the opportunity.

Another free way of providing perks is to negotiate deals for your staff with local businesses. Maybe you could arrange discount gym membership or cheaper lunches from a nearby takeaway. At Xero, we arranged to get a masseuse in for our Customer Care team when they were working flat out at the end of the last financial year. The 15 minute neck massages went down a treat.

Give your staff the opportunity to expand their skills and experience. Strictly speaking this isn’t a perk, but the feeling that their career is advancing is a key motivator for employees.

Finally, try giving a younger staff member increased responsibility. Put them in charge of their own project or make them responsible for some customer accounts. Likewise, consider sending promising staff on a course to improve their skills. Not only will you have more motivated staff, you’ll also end up with more skilled and capable staff, who will ultimately add more value for your business.

Ultimately, the key is to think creatively. You want to find a match between what your employees will value and what you can give them (within a reasonable budget). You’ll have happier, more motivated and more creative staff. What other creative ways have you found to offer great workplace perks on a budget?

Chris Ridd is Xero Australia’s managing director

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 苏州美甲美睫培训学校.